Steve Marsden’s

Elements

The periodic table below is the gateway to the element project at this site. You can select a family of elements by clicking on the group number. Individual elements can be accessed by clicking on the symbol. Information includes a picture of the element (when available), a short background description, and links to other sites containing additional background and data.

After the table you will find a short list of some of the many tables available on the WWW. I selected these because I feel they either contain the most information or present it in a uniquely useful way. Included are the tables which form the link-backbone for my own element sketches.

Check out the special anniversary issue of Chemical & Engineering News which contains essays on all of the elements (even darmstadtium!!). Open access is currently available---but perhaps not forever.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
IA IIA IIIB IVB VB VIB VIIB ____ VIIIB ____ IB IIB IIIA IVA VA VIA VIIA VIIIA
1
1
H
1.01
2
He
4.02
2
3
Li
6.941
4
Be
9.012
5
B
10.81
6
C
12.011
7
N
14.007
8
O
15.999
9
F
18.999
10
Ne
20.18
3
11
Na
22.99
12
Mg
24.31
13
Al
26.982
14
Si
28.09
15
P
30.97
16
S
32.06
17
Cl
35.45
18
Ar
39.95
4
19
K
39.10
20
Ca
40.08
21
Sc
44.96
22
Ti
47.88
23
V
50.94
24
Cr
51.99
25
Mn
54.94
26
Fe
55.85
27
Co
58.93
28
Ni
58.69
29
Cu
63.55
30
Zn
65.38
31
Ga
69.72
32
Ge
72.59
33
As
74.92
34
Se
78.96
35
Br
79.90
36
Kr
83.80
5
37
Rb
85.47
38
Sr
87.62
39
Y
88.91
40
Zr
91.22
41
Nb
92.91
42
Mo
95.94
43
Tc
(98)
44
Ru
101.1
45
Rh
102.9
46
Pd
106.4
47
Ag
107.9
48
Cd
112.4
49
In
114.8
50
Sn
118.7
51
Sb
121.8
52
Te
127.6
53
I
126.9
54
Xe
131.3
6
55
Cs
132.9
56
Ba
137.3
57
La
138.9
72
Hf
178.5
73
Ta
180.9
74
W
183.9
75
Re
186.2
76
Os
190.2
77
Ir
192.2
78
Pt
195.1
79
Au
197.0
80
Hg
200.6
81
Tl
204.4
82
Pb
207.2
83
Bi
208.9
84
Po
(209)
85
At
(210)
86
Rn
(222)
4
58
Ce
140.1
59
Pr
140.9
60
Nd
144.2
61
Pm
(145)
62
Sm
150.4
63
Eu
152.0
64
Gd
157.3
65
Tb
158.9
66
Dy
162.5
67
Ho
164.9
68
Er
167.3
69
Tm
168.9
70
Yb
173.0
71
Lu
175.0
5
90
Th
232.0
91
Pa
231.0
92
U
238.0
93
Np
237.0
94
Pu
(244)
95
Am
(243)
96
Cm
(247)
97
Bk
(247)
98
Cf
(251)
99
Es
(252)
100
Fm
(257)
101
Md
(258)
102
No
(259)
103
Lr
(262)
  • And here are some of what I think are the best of the rest on the Web:
  • Mark Winter's WebElements, ver. 2.0

    An excellent periodic table if you want data (LOTS of data) on an element.

  • Periodic Table Live!

    This spectacular effort hosted at the University of Wisconsin is a project of the Division of Chemical Education. It contains all kinds of data on the elements, still pictures of samples, and the elusive videos (QuickTime) of many elements reacting with air, water, acid and base.

  • Shockwave Periodic Table

    This table from the American Chemical Society employs Shockwave and includes the typical data as well as electron configurations and the ability to plot various properties versus atomic number.

  • Chemicool Periodic Table

    Designed and maintained by David Hsu, this one has good basic data, some reaction information, etc. A nice-looking graphic interface.

  • ChemGlobe's Periodic Table of the Elements

    Historical information, isotopes, physical and atomic properties and more. From Paul Kremer.

  • Molecule Man's Cyber-rific Periodic Table

    Well....don't let the title discourage you! This table from the Bayer Coporation packs a lot of information into a small package. Particularly nice is the quick "what's it good for?" mouseover on each element. More information, historical and other, is just a click away.

  • Periodic Table from Spectrum Laboratories

    Each element symbol links to a page of extensive data and background information on the element. Most of the background information comes from the CRC Handbook.

  • Periodic Table of the Elements

    Excellent table with physical and chemical data as well as some historical background. From Eni Generalic, Split, Croatia.

  • Integral Science Periodic Table

    Actually a suite of table styles all linked to extensive data and information on each element. More information at the site on a Windows application of the web version. From Qivx, Inc.

  • The Periodic Table, v. 2.5

    An excellent offering from Soft Ciências, including biographical information on many scientists, pictures of most elements and a brief history of their discovery, much data, etc. Some construction still going on, but largely complete. Miguel Marques.

  • The Pictorial Periodic Table

    Just possibly the periodic table to end all periodic tables. Includes data, background, pictures, interactive graphing and bracketed searching of properties, etc. From Chris Heilman at Phoenix College.

  • Periodic Properties in a Table from MIT

    Choose the property you want and display it in the periodic table. You can also graph the properties vs. atomic number to investigate the trends.

  • Elemental Spectra

    This is a very slick JAVA table from the Physics Applets project at the University of Oregon. You select an element and view its absorption or emission spectrum. You can also scan through the spectrum and check the wavelength of each line.

  • Periodic table of minerals

    From Webmineral.com, this table includes extensive lists of mineral compositions for each element, borax and phosphate bead tables, and a table of emission spectra for many elements.

  • The Chemical Elements

    Strictly speaking this is not a periodic table site of the usual sort. There is a table, but it serves only as an entry into essays on the discovery and naming of the elements. From D. Trapp.

  • The Visual Elements Periodic Table

    Part of a visually stunning site maintained by the Chemical Society, this table incorporates original art work along with general background on each element and some data in PDF form. You will need the Adobe Acrobat reader for the data. Some of the art work is available for download as screen savers and backgrounds.

  • Periodic table applet

    This JAVA applet from Visual Entities give the usual information but in an interesting and slick fashion. Somewhat unique is the sliding scale for data such as discovery date, abundance, melting point, etc. Worth a look.

  • Printable periodic tables

    These files were prepared by Scott Van Bramer at Widener University and are in Adobe Acrobat format which means they make you want to run to the optometrist when you see them on your screen but they print beautifully. All the most current information up to element 118!

    And just for fun......

  • Elements in the Comics: A comic book periodic table

    Remember the Metal Men? Well, you have to be of a certain age... Anyway, this is a fun place if you have ever had any connection with comic books. From Jim Holler and Jack Selegue at the University of Kentucky.

  • The Wooden Periodic Table

    Surely one of the more unusual entries in the seemingly endless category of online periodic tables. Definitely more than a weekend project. Some chemistry here, but mostly just whistles of amazement---and pictures of many of the elements.

  • The Elements, by Tom Lehrer

    An MP3 version of the classic recording. From Harry Clark's Chemistry Web site at Jesuit High School.

  • The Elements, by Tom Lehrer

    Here is an alternate site for Lehrer's classic recording from the hosts of the Pictorial Periodic Table (above). This one includes the lyrics (so you can sing along...) and the recording in QuickTime format. This version seems to have an even faster tempo--if possible! Although there is a warning about the audio file only being suitable for a Mac, I had no trouble with my PC.

  • The Elements, by Tom Lehrer

    O.K., O.K....this is the last one! Very cleverly animated in Flash. From Mike Stanfill, a graphic designer at privatehand.com